ADB: Pertumbuhan Saja Tidak Cukup Akhiri Kemiskinan

A new study by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the National University of Singapore reveals that despite Asia’s rapid growth, a large number still live in poverty and suffer hunger and other forms of deprivation. The ADB has warned this could dampen the sustainability of the region’s growth and aimed integration. “Ending Asian Deprivations,” a compilation of analyses from 23 development experts across the region, cites that despite the region’s boom, the number of people left behind suggests that past development efforts have not been enough to end poverty and deprivation. While GDP growth helps income poverty reduction, the report shows [GDP] plays a much smaller part in eliminating other deprivations, like education and health outcomes. In addition, the spike in inequality creates an environment that impacts future economic growth through slower poverty reduction and employment generation. “Asia’s future prosperity will only be assured if countries continue the fight against poverty and other areas of deprivation; but this will require proactive state intervention,” says Kazu Sakai, director-general of the ADB’s Strategy and Policy Department. As the 2015 deadline for the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) looms, the report provides a timely reminder of the areas in the region that still need to be worked on and the steps to be done to end deprivation across the board. There has been a sharp decline in poverty levels in recent decades, but a fifth of Asia’s population still lives in extreme poverty—a figure that could rise to one in two if vulnerable groups who can easily revert to extreme poverty are included. In terms of achieving the MDGs, many countries likely fall short in areas like basic sanitation, underweight children, infant and maternal mortality. To make growth more inclusive and promote more effective state action, new approaches may be considered beneficial in areas such as skills development, delivery of quality education, and incentives for entrepreneurs. These must be implemented along with institutional improvements and stronger partnerships with the private sector and the civil society. Lawmakers will also need to play a bigger role to promote better conditions for small- and medium-enterprises to bloom; and reduce the informal sector through actions like property rights improvement and financial access. Similarly, the state needs to increase support in areas like infrastructure; improving urban environments, social protection programmes; the removal of gender inequities; and labour market rigidities to increase opportunities for employment. Tighter regional cooperation is also vital, with the ADB anticipating infrastructure projects for cross-border connectivity that could benefit [regional] development in the decade up to 2020 and beyond. Clearly-defined goals with a definite timeframe are what any successful development approach needs; plus a strategy to achieve them, and a detailed list of public interventions. Hence, future development goals need to incorporate region- and country-specific needs to add to effective base goals. Source: http://asianngo.org/news/content/original/adb-study-growth-not-enough-end-poverty

A new study by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the National University of Singapore reveals that despite Asia’s rapid growth, a large number still live in poverty and suffer hunger and other forms of deprivation. The ADB has warned this could dampen the sustainability of the region’s growth and aimed integration. “Ending Asian Deprivations,” a compilation of analyses from 23 development experts across the region, cites that despite the region’s boom, the number of people left behind suggests that past development efforts have not been enough to end poverty and deprivation. While GDP growth helps income poverty reduction, the report shows [GDP] plays a much smaller part in eliminating other deprivations, like education and health outcomes. In addition, the spike in inequality creates an environment that impacts future economic growth through slower poverty reduction and employment generation. “Asia’s future prosperity will only be assured if countries continue the fight against poverty and other areas of deprivation; but this will require proactive state intervention,” says Kazu Sakai, director-general of the ADB’s Strategy and Policy Department. As the 2015 deadline for the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) looms, the report provides a timely reminder of the areas in the region that still need to be worked on and the steps to be done to end deprivation across the board. There has been a sharp decline in poverty levels in recent decades, but a fifth of Asia’s population still lives in extreme poverty—a figure that could rise to one in two if vulnerable groups who can easily revert to extreme poverty are included. In terms of achieving the MDGs, many countries likely fall short in areas like basic sanitation, underweight children, infant and maternal mortality. To make growth more inclusive and promote more effective state action, new approaches may be considered beneficial in areas such as skills development, delivery of quality education, and incentives for entrepreneurs. These must be implemented along with institutional improvements and stronger partnerships with the private sector and the civil society. Lawmakers will also need to play a bigger role to promote better conditions for small- and medium-enterprises to bloom; and reduce the informal sector through actions like property rights improvement and financial access. Similarly, the state needs to increase support in areas like infrastructure; improving urban environments, social protection programmes; the removal of gender inequities; and labour market rigidities to increase opportunities for employment. Tighter regional cooperation is also vital, with the ADB anticipating infrastructure projects for cross-border connectivity that could benefit [regional] development in the decade up to 2020 and beyond. Clearly-defined goals with a definite timeframe are what any successful development approach needs; plus a strategy to achieve them, and a detailed list of public interventions. Hence, future development goals need to incorporate region- and country-specific needs to add to effective base goals. Source: http://asianngo.org/news/content/original/adb-study-growth-not-enough-end-poverty
A new study by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the National University of Singapore reveals that despite Asia’s rapid growth, a large number still live in poverty and suffer hunger and other forms of deprivation. The ADB has warned this could dampen the sustainability of the region’s growth and aimed integration. “Ending Asian Deprivations,” a compilation of analyses from 23 development experts across the region, cites that despite the region’s boom, the number of people left behind suggests that past development efforts have not been enough to end poverty and deprivation. While GDP growth helps income poverty reduction, the report shows [GDP] plays a much smaller part in eliminating other deprivations, like education and health outcomes. In addition, the spike in inequality creates an environment that impacts future economic growth through slower poverty reduction and employment generation. “Asia’s future prosperity will only be assured if countries continue the fight against poverty and other areas of deprivation; but this will require proactive state intervention,” says Kazu Sakai, director-general of the ADB’s Strategy and Policy Department. As the 2015 deadline for the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) looms, the report provides a timely reminder of the areas in the region that still need to be worked on and the steps to be done to end deprivation across the board. There has been a sharp decline in poverty levels in recent decades, but a fifth of Asia’s population still lives in extreme poverty—a figure that could rise to one in two if vulnerable groups who can easily revert to extreme poverty are included. In terms of achieving the MDGs, many countries likely fall short in areas like basic sanitation, underweight children, infant and maternal mortality. To make growth more inclusive and promote more effective state action, new approaches may be considered beneficial in areas such as skills development, delivery of quality education, and incentives for entrepreneurs. These must be implemented along with institutional improvements and stronger partnerships with the private sector and the civil society. Lawmakers will also need to play a bigger role to promote better conditions for small- and medium-enterprises to bloom; and reduce the informal sector through actions like property rights improvement and financial access. Similarly, the state needs to increase support in areas like infrastructure; improving urban environments, social protection programmes; the removal of gender inequities; and labour market rigidities to increase opportunities for employment. Tighter regional cooperation is also vital, with the ADB anticipating infrastructure projects for cross-border connectivity that could benefit [regional] development in the decade up to 2020 and beyond. Clearly-defined goals with a definite timeframe are what any successful development approach needs; plus a strategy to achieve them, and a detailed list of public interventions. Hence, future development goals need to incorporate region- and country-specific needs to add to effective base goals. – See more at: http://asianngo.org/news/content/original/adb-study-growth-not-enough-end-poverty#sthash.vDcs98be.dpu

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